We Ought to Fight Dependence on Technology

However, these ‘beautiful’ inventions continue to have stern tolls on us, and more so on children. While investigations continue on what these electronics do to our physics and psych, let’s mull-over how they both enable and deprive us in equal measures, what they give and take from us, and whether the joy and satisfaction of their usage is commensurate to the degree of damage and why we should be concerned about the health of our current and future generations, and the need to entertain conversations on self regulations but also educate young ones on the potential dangers of addiction to certain equipment.

As concerned adults who desire to leave this world a better place for young people, we ought to keep both eyes open on the likely long-term implications of the decisions we make on behalf of children and the kinds of adults we want to nurture them into as custodians of the future. As for cutleries, they are both attractive and fancy to use but we also need to skill children to use their hands to eat – anyhow, studies have demonstrated its physical and cognitive value.

I implore you to conduct self and family audits including assessing your children’s abilities to wash dishes, mop, wash their own pants, as well as the hours spent seated operating electronic devices. Studies have shown that an average person spends four years of their life looking down on their cell phones. It’s vital to plan and organise the best for our children but it’s equally crucial that we prepare them to walk through worse case scenarios of life in difficult times of life – for which they do come.

Technology should not strip us off our ‘human’ ability to survive and thrive independently. Above all, we shouldn’t be enslaved by our own inventions. Whether or not you have a family or children, may this piece re-awaken our thoughts on children’s upbringing and rekindle our conscience in shaping the future for younger generations, and towards the ideal environment with which we all wish to happily retire in the evening hours of our natural lives. I’m not a ranting unemployed youth. It’s not poverty compelling me to write, I’m not asking readers to stop stocking technology ‘goodies’. I also fancy contemporary ‘good life’ and therefore not insinuating regression to old school hassles. Rather, I’m a concern citizen and I hope you join me in fighting dependency on technology.

Onen David Ongwech. Email: onen@onendavid.com

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