Category: Biodiversite

Biodiversite

Why Congo’s decision to open national parks to drilling isn’t really about oil BY PATRICK EDMOND & KRISTOF TITECA

Sources: African arguments     Last month, the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) triggered international outrage when it confirmed that it was considering opening up two of its national parks to oil exploration. It said a committee would put together plans to declassify parts of Salonga and Virunga in a bid to increase oil production. Both national parks are...

A Record 207 Environmental Activists Were Killed Last Year. More than 200 environmental activists were killed in 2017, according to the latest report from global rights watchdog Global Witness. By Lorraine Chow

More than 200 environmental activists were killed in 2017, according to the latest report from global rights watchdog Global Witness. The troubling report revealed that 207 men and women across 22 countries were murdered last year defending their land and resources, making it the worst year on record. Agribusiness was the industry most associated with these attacks—highlighting the devastating cost...

Bio-piracy: the sale of Uganda’s lakes to investors

Mary Serumaga Appeared on the net on Apr 06, 2018 The fishermen of Kabarole District appear to have blown the whistle on an audacious act of bio-piracy. They brought to the attention of the authorities that they were being barred from access to the 53 crater lakes that they have fished in from time immemorial. In law this is known...

VINTAGE FILM OF A BATWA COMMUNITY BUILDING A BRIDGE IN THE CONGOLESE RAINFOREST

The following is a link to a film made possibly in the 1930’s (?) in the Congo. It is about a group of Batwa (Pygmies) who build a bridge spanning a river teeming with crocodiles. It was produced by Castle Films for their series “The Adventure Parade”. The narration is condescending but the film is worth that annoyance  

Ota Benga, the African Man Exhibited in a New York Zoo’s Monkey Cage

It is Saturday the 8th of September in 1906, and hundreds of people are standing around a monkey house in the New York Zoological Gardens. It is Saturday the 8th of September in 1906, and hundreds of people are standing around a monkey house in the New York Zoological Gardens. Slavery was abolished on paper forty years ago but the...

SOS: Save our seas By Rene Wadlow

On 5 to 9 June 2017, the United Nations will bring together in New York the representatives of governments, of governmental regional associations such as the Alliance of Small Island States, non-governmental organizations, private corporations, and academic institutions to study the challenges which face humanity to conserve and use our oceans, seas and marine resources for sustainable development. The status...

Somalia: A country devastated by drought, famine and conflict by Bashir Goth

  Somalia’s president has declared the famine ravaging the country a national disaster. There has been little response from the world.  Drought is a natural calamity that can happen anywhere, but what makes it more deadly in Somalia is the continued conflict that prevents relief aid from reaching the needy or makes it difficult for affected nomads to travel to...

Imperialism’s Junior Partners By Patrick Bond

Dilma Rousseff and Jacob Zuma at the 2014 BRICS summit in Brazil. GovernmentZA / Flickr Our new issue, “Between the Risings,” is out now. To celebrate its release, international subscriptions are $25 off, and limited prints of our Easter 1916 cover are available. On May 12, Brazil’s democratic government, led by the Workers’ Party (PT), was the victim of a...